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City Back-Street: oil 10x8 inches

, 12:40



Another DailyPaintWorks challenge, this time the challenge was to turn the reference image upside down and paint from it. I have known about this method for a long time, but oddly enough have never tried it (to the best of my knowledge). I decided to choose a subject with definite shapes in it, rather than something "organic". Townscapes are not my usual theme, but it can be interesting to just paint in "blocks" of colour and see the buildings emerge. This time I painted on a stretched canvas; I actually wish I had stuck to my usual board because this canvas seemed a little hungry for my paint oil. Nonetheless it was completed over a four-hour period (with an hour out for lunch!)....seems a long time for a 10x8, but in fact it took me a while to get used to handling the upside-down image, so I was rather slow. And I didn't turn the painting round the right away until I'd finished....in the end I was quite surprised at the result, that it had actually come out looking like the street....but in a looser style. I agree that "upside down" prevents too much fiddling detail and really does make you think differently. The picture isn't for sale at this time because I'm not going to be around for a while.

I shall possibly have to miss the next challenge because I shall be absent from the computer; but maybe I'll be able to catch up in due course. This will be my last post this month; am back again after the first week of September.

P.S for those recently visiting the blog, I am sorry that the comments are off, but I was receiving a lot of spam. I may have to look for an alternative blog system, although I prefer to keep it all under my own control, rather than letting the likes of Blogger et al run the show.

In progress---Late Afternoon, Back Street: oil 12x9 inches

, 18:03

More out of my comfort zone, this painting was done for the DailypaintWorks.com weekly challenge; theme, light and shadows. I will finish it when the paint has dried back a bit and is not so sticky. The windows still need forming, and various sections of the roofs need more definition. The source image was a photo taken in the nearby city, catching the buildings half in light and half shadow.

For some unexplainable reason, the oil paintings have been going very well and I have put pastels on the back burner for the time being. I have completed six oils in around eight days, which is unheard of. I set my mind to tackling the DPW weekly challenge, producing the jug and spoon painting a couple of weeks ago, then moved on to complete FruitBowl (last post), plus another still life, a small floral, a further still life and now Late Afternoon (in progress). Apart from today's post, the others were all painted directly from life and I think this has suddenly kick-started a flow of work.

I am hoping that this will help in time to direct the pastel paintings away from a more "drawn" appearance to one of a "painted" look. It is tempting to draw every last detail, even when using pastels....by working in oils in a quicker, more broad manner, I hope to transfer some of that thinking over to the pastels (eventually).

On the technical front, I am planning to move my entire website over to the https protocol. I've recoded all the website, but the blog might cause problems, since there are many internal links to images (in each post) that I have to find the code for, to alter (if I can). When this will happen, I don't know but possibly during next week. If it all goes wrong, then I shall have to simply reload with the old http protocol and try to fathom out what went wrong.

Magnolia Window: pastel 10x10 inches

, 11:32



Pastel on Canson "Touch" brown pastel paper.
A local cottage has a very nice magnolia tree that spreads out across its front wall and flowers prolifically in the springtime. I have aimed to capture the Victorian window style and surrounding stonework, set against the blossoming tree.
Short post this time....very busy. This pic is listed at DailyPaintWorks.com

Summer's Yellow: pastel 6x7 inches

, 13:33

Somewhat indisposed right now and unable to do much painting; a couple of weeks from now should be easier. Managed this little one a few days ago, on UART 400-grit paper. The view is taken from a coastal walk done a few short years ago; looking down into a shallow valley en route, to see this white farmhouse nestled amongst sunny trees and bushes.

Queen's Parade, Brandon Hill, Bristol: pastel 12x12 inches

, 11:39

A subject like this is quite a step away from my usual stuff but it made a change and allowed me to get a break from intense, close-up work. Having said that, it took me a while to do all the windows....

This pastel is on Sennelier card, a warm sienna colour. It tends to be quite toothy and in some ways wasn't quite so ideal for some of the detailed parts, but it worked nicely in the grass and tree areas. The terrace of buildings, in reality, has been painted in various colours (thankfully none of them too brash) and add an extra dimension to a scene which would ordinarily be just a little drab during an English winter.

I used hard pastels to start the work with and also had to make a few starter attempts on the angle and positioning of the buildings---they start to slope downhill at one point. This layout I did at home, would have been tricky outdoors. The evening glow was built up with a layer of pastel pencils to start with, then soft pastel added on top. I resorted to hard conte sticks and pencils to get the windows and doors marked out. The park grass and trees were kept a little looser in working.

"Shed and Companions": pastel 6x6 inches...(now Sold)

, 17:28

Brief change of scene, but still sticking to small format, this little shed looked very picturesque when first spotted; complete with delicate scented floral companions. Working this small with pastel can be challenging, especially when it comes to smaller detail, but in fact the thickness of pastel sticks helps to avoid overdoing things. You just can't fiddle that much, as you can with a size 5/0 brush. I have considerable respect for people like Karen Margulis who works pastels at ACEO size (3.5 x 2.5 inches)....I'm afraid these days I have to resort to a magnifying glass as well as ordinary glasses when things get this small, otherwise I would miss the pastel-paper entirely.

https://www.dailypaintworks.com/buy/auction/601870 SOLD.

Glastonbury: Ink on paper 16x11 inches

, 14:10

Just a complete break for a few days from oil painting, in order to play with something new. I have read several articles on ink and gouache resist techniques but never tried them. They seem to work best with strong shapes and structures, so I dug out a photograph of Glastonbury Tor, famous English landmark, and did a drawing on watercolour paper. The technique then requires the artist to cover over those areas that need to be white in the final picture. The covering is done with thick white gouache paint. Once this is thoroughly dry, the whole picture is painted over with black india ink (waterproof). This must also be left to dry.

When ready, the paper is placed under a cold flow of water and the gouache paint, although covered with ink, will begin to drift off the paper. The ink on top of it will also flow off. Areas that were not painted with gouache will be black ink. However...

The random nature of this process shows that some areas of white will be flecked with black. Also, some thinner patches of gouache will not totally resist the ink and thus may turn quite dark. In my picture, the black patch on the right hand side happened because I did not paint thickly enough with the white gouache.

The overall effect is one reminiscent of a woodcut. The image is stark black and white. It is possible to add colour but the black ink will resist most water-based paints. You might paint over it with thick acrylic, however.

I decided to leave this image alone and not add colour. I may do a second one....it will never come out the same as the first...and try adding colour as an experiment.

A few days ago I carried out another wash for a different subject, which is more complex. It is testing the ability to place black and white areas in the image; sometimes I get it right, sometimes not. The images are far more graphic than "standard" painting; they may help to create new painting ideas for me.

Good fun in between my usual oil paintings.

Monochrome

, 10:29

Due to people who have loaded my blog with spam messages, I have decided to not accept comments; I really don't have the time to trawl through several hundred spam per week in order to find genuine posters, so regrettably I've had to disable the system. Now... I am taking a few weeks' break from pastels and now doing some drawing instead. I have a fair collection of drawing materials including carbon pencils, water-soluble graphite, charcoal, graphitint pencils and faber-Castell coloured pencils. Usually I am busy with pastels and don't draw as much as I should. This tonal piece is subject-matter away from my usual comfort-zone. I just wanted to get away from colour and do something structured.

Kingston Buildings, Bath : pencil, carbon pencil and water-wash on cartridge paper